Sankofa Spotlight

Illustration by Marisa McCarthy

Illustration by Marisa McCarthy

Sankofa is an African word from the Akan tribe in Ghana with a literal translation of “it is not taboo to fetch what is at risk of being left behind” — with the implication that the knowledge of the past must never be forgotten.

If it happened… If it was accomplished… It deserves to be told.

Inspired by the Sankofa principle, we spotlight the stories of well-known and unsung sheroes whose bodies were used for medical experiments without their consent. In addition, we assert and uplift the contributions of Black women in the medical, science, and health fields in this country. By keeping these stories alive, we honor our ancestral memory in order to connect the past to the present and focus the gaze of history on neglected truths.

Mahalia Jackson: An Amazing Legend of Grace and Strength

By Resilient Sisterhood Project

Image Source: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Carl Van Vechten Collection Throughout this year as we celebrate our 10th anniversary, we will honor a series of remarkable women. For Women’s History Month, we find it fitting to start with civil rights activist, philanthropist, and queen of gospel, Mahalia Jackson. Born in New Orleans…

Gwen Ifill

Remembering Gwen Ifill

By Resilient Sisterhood Project

As a ground-breaking and successful journalist, newscaster, political analyst, and author, Gwen Ifill was an inspiration to many Black girls and women. She was born on September 29, 1955 in Jamaica, Queens in New York City to (Oliver) Urcille and Elenor Ifill. Her father, an African Methodist Episcopal minister, emigrated from Panama, and her mother…